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California Redwoods and Waterfalls:
Big Basin Berry Creek Falls
March

March on the Berry Creek Falls Loop (BCFL) Trail in the Forest of Big Basin State Park.
Route was clockwise (except where stated otherwise). Report is by J. Zimmerman (except where stated otherwise).

Flower are our stars 2008 (counter-clockwise).
Flower are our stars 2007 (counter-clockwise).
Flower are our stars 2006.
Flower are our stars 2005.
Flower are our stars 2004.
Flower are our stars 2003: Awaiting 2003 report from Scott Peden.
Flower are our stars 2002 by Scott Peden. and March 2002 flower list.

Also:
Flower are our stars 7-year summary of flower-slug-newt data.
Flower are our stars Castle Rock State Park wildflowers.
Flower are our stars Flower-slug-newt count graph.
Flower are our stars Wildflower species calendar on BCFL Trail.
Flower are our stars Walk With Scott Peden in Big Basin State Park.
NEW AUGUST 2005 Paces calibration (Berry Creek Falls Loop Trail).

hazelnut

Designation of "unique": refers to any species that was seen in a single location on the reported day.

Designation of New flower added to our spotting: In these reports, New flower added to our spotting ("New") refers to a flower that was not spotted by us in previous years.

Designation of "early": refers to any species that we are seeing this month on this trail for the first time since we started this record. [These flowers have often been reported by others this early. They are, however, early for us.]


Wednesday, March 5, 2008 - counter-clockwise.

Report by J. Zimmerman.

Flowers (alphabetically):

  1. Brittle-leaved manzanita; showy white clusters of flowers.
  2. Bush Poppy. Yellow.
  3. California fetid adder's tongue (Scoliopus bigelovii) (many locations, over 50 blooms).
  4. California strawberry (Fragaria californica).
  5. ["unique"]. Checker lily (a.k.a. mission bells; a.k.a. Chocolate lily). Previously designated Fritillaria lanceolata and now corrected to Fritillaria affins
  6. Coltsfoot (Petasites frigidus).
  7. ["unique"; at HQ]. Dandelion (ALIEN).
  8. Huckleberry.
  9. New flower added to our spotting this year ["unique"]. Red alder catkins.
  10. Redwood sorrel (Oxalis oregana). Pink; sometimes white, mauve, or bluish.
  11. Redwood violet.
  12. Small-leaved (sensitive) manzanita .
  13. Toothwort (Dentaria californica).
  14. New flower added to our spotting ["unique"; at HQ]. Western bittercress (Cardamine oligosperma). Tiny white flowers; tiny opposite leaves.
  15. Western wake robin (Trillium ovatum).
  16. Western wood anemone (a.k.a. Wind flower or Oregon anemone) (Anemone oregana). White.


Wednesday, March 7, 2007 - counter-clockwise.

Report by J. Zimmerman.


At the Ranger Station HQ:
  1. Redwood sorrel (Oxalis oregana). Pink.
  2. ["unique"] Dandelion (ALIEN).
  3. New flower added to our spotting this year ["unique"] Yellow dock (a.k.a. curly dock) (Rumex crispus) (ALIEN).
  4. Little white flower; possibly a montia.

    Taking Dool Trail toward Sunset Trail - beginning our counter-clockwise exploration.

  5. Redwood violet (yellow).

    By Middle Ridge Fire Road (on Sunset Trail): 0 slugs.

  6. Toothwort. Pink.

    By Sky-Line-to-the-Sea Trail Connector (on Sunset Trail): 0 slugs.

  7. ["unique"] Two-eyed violet (Viola ocellata).
  8. Western wake robin (Trillium Ovatum).
  9. Coltsfoot (Petasites frigidus).

    By West Waddell Creek Bridge (on Sunset Trail): 9 new slugs; 9 total.

    By Timms Creek Trail (on Sunset Trail): 0 new slugs; 9 total.

    By East Berry Creek Bridge (on Sunset Trail): 1 new slug; 10 total.

  10. New flower added to our spotting this year Golden Chinquapin. Both as we entered the Chaparral and at Sunset connector trail, had both male and female flowers
  11. Several small-leaved Manzanita (Sensitive Manzanita) in bloom (white).
  12. Several brittle-leaved Manzanita in bloom (white). This has the prettiest (equals showiest) blossoms; each leaf is on a petiole (leaf stem); and the leaves are very brittle and easily snapped.
  13. Yellow bush poppy.

    By Sunset Camp Connector Trail: 1 new slug; 11 total.

  14. ["unique"]. Checker lily (a.k.a. mission bells; a.k.a. Chocolate lily). Previously designated Fritillaria lanceolata and now corrected to Fritillaria affins
  15. California Fetid Adder's Tongue (Scoliopus bigelovii).

    By Silver Falls: 1 new slug; 12 total. First newt (in water at Silver Falls); 1 total.

  16. ["unique"] Alum root (a.k.a. crevice heuchera or small-flowered heuchera) (Heuchera micrantha). Petals curl back; leaves are five-lobed (leaves of the similar sugar scoop are three-lobed).
  17. Western wood anemone (a.k.a. Wind flower or Oregon anemone) (Anemone oregana). White.

    By BC Falls Bench: 3 new slugs; 15 total. 3 new newts; 4 total.

    By Berry Creek Falls view from Seat: 2 new slugs; 17 total. 0 new newts; 4 total.

    By Waddell Creek Bridge: 0 new slugs; 17 total. 0 new newts; 4 total.

    By Timms Creek Trail: 7 new slugs; 24 total. 3 new newts; 7 total.

    By West (lower) End of the connector trail: 3 new slugs; 27 total. 0 new newts; 7 total.

    By East (upper) End of the connector trail: 2 new slugs; 29 total. 0 new newts; 7 total.

    By Kelly Creek Bridge: 1 new slug; 30 total. 0 new newt; 7 total.

  18. ["unique"] Douglas' Nightshade (Solanum douglasii). White.

    By Sunset connector: 8 new slugs; 38 total. 1 new newt; 8 total.

    By Middle Ridge Fire Road: 0 new slugs; 38 total. 0 new newts; 8 total.

    Arriving back at HQ via Sky-Line-to-the-Sea Trail: 1 new slug; 39 total. 0 new newts; 8 total.

Wednesday, March 1, 2006.

Report by J. Zimmerman.

Thanks to Hooray for crews our heroes, the trail-clearing crews, for their great clearing of the downed trees reported January and February. We appreciate the huge amount of unseen work that they do to make this part of the park accessible to us.

A few more trees are down, but the main result of recent winds was about a dozen new widow makers (roughly one per mile) along the trail. The old bridge over West Waddell Creek is very weak and rickety; be especially careful here.

Redwood duff. 15 (47%).
Moss. 6 (19%)
Tan oak leaves. 6 (19%) (1 of these was on twigs)
Lichen. 2 (6%)
Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), (1 on base of trunk; 1 on fallen twigs). 2 (6%)
Sword fern stems (decaying). 1 (3%)
Mushrooms or Mud. 0
Maple leaf (decaying). 0
Redwood violet or sorrel leaf (decaying). 0

Compare with vegetation where the slugs were in January 2006.


At the Ranger Station HQ:
  1. Redwood sorrel (Oxalis oregana). White.

    Take Sky-Line-to-the-Sea Trail toward Middle Ridge Fire Road.

  2. Redwood violet (yellow).

    By Middle Ridge Fire Road: 0 slugs so far.

  3. Toothwort.

    By Sunset Connector Trail junction: 0 slugs so far.

    By Kelly Creek Bridge: 5 new slugs, 5 total.

    By East End (upper) of the side trail: 1 new slug, 6 total.

  4. Western wake robin (Trillium Ovatum).

    By West End (lower) of the side trail: 5 new slugs, 11 total.

    By Timms Creek Trail: 0 new slugs, 11 total. 2 newts, 2 total.

  5. Coltsfoot (Petasites frigidus).
  6. ["early"] California hazel (Corylus cornuta, ssp. californica): pale-yellow 2-inch male (pollen) catkins and delicate crimson whispy-petalled (tenth-inch) female (ovary) flowers.
  7. Western wood anemone (a.k.a. Wind flower or Oregon anemone) (Anemone oregana). White.

    By West Waddell Creek Bridge: 2 new slugs, 13 total. 3 more newts, 5 total.

    By Berry Creek Falls first view (at Seat): 0 new slug. 0 more newts.

    By Berry Creek Falls viewing platform and bench: 4 new slugs, 17 total. 0 more newts.

    By Silver Falls. 5 new slugs, 22 total. 4 more newts, 9 total.

    By Sunset Camp Connector Trail junction with Sunset Trail: 2 new slugs, 24 total. 1 more newt, 10 total.

  8. Also another Manzanita with dusty leaves and no burl compared with Sensitive Manzanita.
  9. Yellow bush poppy.
  10. ["unique"] Lupine
  11. Small-leaved Manzanita (Sensitive Manzanita).
  12. Huckleberry (white).

    By East Berry Creek Bridge: 0 new slugs, 24 total. 1 more newt, 11 total.

    By Timms Creek Trail junction with Sunset Trail: 2 new slugs, 26 total.

    By West Waddell Creek Bridge: 0 new slugs, 26 total.

    By Sky-Line-to-the-Sea Trail Connector junction with Sunset Trail: 5 new slugs, 31 total.

  13. California (or Pacific) blackberry (Rubus ursinus).

    By Middle Ridge Fire Road: 1 new slug, 32 total.

    By Dool Trail: 0 new slugs, 32 total.

    By HQ: 0 new slugs, 32 total.

Wednesday, March 2, 2005.

Report by J. Zimmerman.

At the Ranger Station HQ:

  1. Redwood sorrel (Oxalis oregana). White; sometimes mauve, pinkish, or bluish.

    Take Sky-Line-to-the-Sea Trail toward Middle Ridge Fire Road.

  2. Redwood violet (a.k.a. Evergreen violet) (Viola sempervirens).
    Black horn of plenty.
    A flock of juncos.
  3. Toothwort (Dentaria californica, var. integrifolia). White, sometimes with lavender tinge.

    By Middle Ridge Fire Road: slug count so far is 0.

  4. ["early"] Hooker's fairy bell (Disporum hookeri). Flowers are hidden in pairs under the ends of the twin leaves at the end of the stalks.
  5. Two-eyed violet (Viola ocellata).
  6. ["unique"] ["early"] Branched (or Fat) Solomon's seal (Smilacina racemosa).

    By Sunset Connector Trail junction: 5 new slugs, 5 total.

  7. ["unique"] ["early"] Blue Witch. Dark blue flower with bright yellow center.
  8. ["unique"] ["early"] Douglas' Nightshade (Solanum douglasii). White.
  9. Western wake robin (Trillium Ovatum).

    By Kelly Creek Bridge: 12 new slugs, 17 total.

    By East End (upper) of the side trail: 12 new slug, 24 total. And 1 terrestrial newt, 1 total.

    Quite amazing: tiny red flowers on the lichen.

    By West End (lower) of the side trail: 11 new slugs, 35 total. And 3 terrestrial newts, 4 total.

    By Timms Creek Trail: 5 new slugs, 40 total. And 13 terrestrial newts, 17 total.

  10. Coltsfoot (Petasites frigidus).
  11. Western wood anemone (a.k.a. Wind flower or Oregon anemone) (Anemone oregana). White.

    By West Waddell Creek Bridge: 12 new slugs, 52 total. And 49!!! terrestrial newts, 66 total.

    By Berry Creek Falls first view (at Seat): 3 new slugs, 55 total. And 3 terrestrial newts, 69 total.

    By Berry Creek Falls viewing platform and bench: 2 new slugs, 57 total.

  12. ["unique"] Alum root (a.k.a. crevice heuchera or small-flowered heuchera) (Heuchera micrantha).
    The petals of this flower curl back.

    By Silver Falls. 22 new slugs, 79 total. And 5 terrestrial newts, giving 74 total.

  13. Checker lily (a.k.a. mission bells; a.k.a. Chocolate lily). Previously designated Fritillaria lanceolata and now corrected to Fritillaria affins

    By Sunset Camp Connector Trail junction with Sunset Trail: Nothing new.

  14. Bush Poppy. Yellow.
  15. Brittle-leaved Manzanita.
  16. Huckleberry (white).
  17. Heart-leaved or Santa Cruz Mountains Manzanita.
  18. Small-leaved Manzanita (Sensitive Manzanita).

    By East Berry Creek Bridge: No slugs. But 1 terrestrial newt, giving 75 total.

    By Timms Creek Trail junction with Sunset Trail: 10 new slug, 89 total. And 1 terrestrial newt, giving 76 total.

    By West Waddell Creek Bridge: 3 new slugs, 92 total.

  19. ["unique"] ["early"] Vetch: Greater vetch a.k.a. Giant vetch (Vicia gigantea).
  20. ["unique"] ["early"] Yerba de selva (a.k.a. Weed of the Woods) (Whipplea modesta).
  21. California (or Pacific) blackberry (Rubus ursinus).
  22. California strawberry (Fragaria californica).

    By Sky-Line-to-the-Sea Trail Connector junction with Sunset Trail: 19 new slugs, 111 total. And 1 terrestrial newt, giving 77 total.

    More Checker lily (a.k.a. mission bells; a.k.a. Chocolate lily). Previously designated Fritillaria lanceolata and now corrected to Fritillaria affins. Greenish-yellow with purple spots. Scott Peden notes that he has seen many checkered lilies, and they are usually less brown than this example. He adds "I have never seen one with such distinct spots and such small spots instead of checkers."

    By Middle Ridge Fire Road: 5 new slugs, 116 total.

    By Dool Trail: No additions.

    By HQ: No additions.



Thursday, March 4, 2004

Report by J. Zimmerman.

14 wildflowers:
 Bush Poppy.                                              Yellow.
 California Toothwort.                                    White or pink.
 Coltsfoot.                                               White.
 Douglas Nightshade (Solanum Douglasii).                  White with gold center.
 Huckleberry.                                             White.
 Manzanita (3 in bloom, including Sensitive Manzanita).   White.
    (Sensitive Manzanita; Brittle Leaved Manzanita; and
     Heart Leaved or Santa Cruz Mountains Manzanita (pinkish cast on their white flowers.))
 Redwood Sorrel.                                          White or pink;
     Scott saw some with "blueish tinge"; we each think the other needs an eye exam.
 Redwood Violet.                                          Yellow.
 Two-eyed violets.                                        White with purple "eyes".
 Western Wake Robin (Trillium Ovatum).                    White (mature pink).
 Wild Strawberry.                                         White.
 Woodland star.                                           White.

Lots of trail blockages, including a spectacular 3-for-1 trail coverage 
near Golden Falls. Naturalist Scott Peden reports that the blockage 
   "is a pair of Douglas-firs (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and a Redwood. 
    The redwood we were able to walk under and is only about 2 foot thick.
    The dougs I think were 3-4 feet thick."
Very slippery trail in many places.
Huge increase in wild pig activity, with overturned dirt beside much of the trail.
Fewer mushrooms.



March 2003

This month's report is in progress by Scott Peden.



March 2002

This report is by Scott Peden.

Frost at the Ranger Station, even at 8:30 AM. Clear, crisp day. No wind. (A change from the 2" of rain from the last 2 days of mild, windy storm.)

As a special treat, a birder accompanied the author, adding to the bird count.

The Medal Count: 13 Different Birds, 12 Banana Slugs, 11 different Wildflowers in Bloom, 3 Newts, 2 Deer, and 1 centipede; also a couple of large fuzzy hover flies, with long proboscis, in the Chaparral area.
(See how to access Scott's Wildflower Photos in his on-line portfolio.)
(Look at slug and wildflower count graph in a new window.)

These were the most common wildflowers seen throughout most of the trail: Western Wake Robin (Trillium), Redwood Violet, Redwood Sorrel, and California Toothwort.

Highlights:

Wildflowers seen on hike in March 2002


  Bush Poppies
  California Black Berry
  California Toothwort. 
  Coltsfoot. 
  Manzanita (2 types in bloom)
  Redwood Sorrel
  Redwood Violet
  Two-eyed violets.
  Western Wake Robin (Trillium)
  Wild Strawberry 
  Windflowers. 

See also these books